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Prenatal cannabis exposure and its long-lasting effects on child development
Isabelle Phan
Division:
Mathematics and Sciences
Department:
Biology
Mentor:
Kelli Elliott
Mentor's e-mail:
kelliott@occ.cccd.edu
Author's e-mail:
thuytrinhphan17@gmail.com
Abstract:

Marijuana is a widely used substance in the U.S., especially after recent policy changes in more than 30 states[1]. There is a growing number of pregnant women reporting marijuana use, not only because more women in fertile age groups use marijuana, but also the increasingly permissive legal and social acceptance of it allows women to more freely disclose their substance uses during pregnancy[2]. This research analyzes the purposes of marijuana use in pregnant women, the relationship between prenatal exposure to cannabis and the development of the fetus, and the potential effects of prenatal marijuana use on children’s mental health and learning abilities. This is a literature review of scholarly articles regarding maternal use/exposure to marijuana and its effects on children. Currently, most marijuana use is for recreational purposes, only a small amount is used for medicinal purposes because scientists haven’t had a full understanding of Cannabis sativa yet. Because of the wide legalization and acceptance, many pregnant women prefer marijuana over prescribed medication for their pregnancy’s uncomfortable symptoms and mood management since they believe marijuana is a safe and natural remedy[3]. Prenatal exposure to marijuana may associate with mental disorders, ADHD, depression, and learning ability defects among children whose mothers used cannabis during pregnancy[4]. Studies suggest that increasing prenatal educational programs will result in greater numbers of subjects reducing use or quitting cannabis for their babies’ benefits.

[1] NIDA. "What is the scope of marijuana use in the United States?." National Institute on Drug Abuse, 8 Apr. 2020, https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/marijuana/what-scope-marijuana-use-in-united-states Accessed 1 Mar. 2021.[2]Ko, Jean Y., et al. “Characteristics of Marijuana Use During Pregnancy — Eight States, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 2017.” MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 69, no. 32, 2020, pp. 1058–63. Crossref, doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6932a2[3] Grant, Kimberly S et al. “Cannabis use during pregnancy: Pharmacokinetics and effects on child development.” Pharmacology & therapeutics vol. 182 (2018): 133-151. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2017.08.014[4] Roncero C, Valriberas-Herrero I, Mezzatesta-Gava M, Villegas JL, Aguilar L, Grau-López L. Cannabis use during pregnancy and its relationship with fetal developmental outcomes and psychiatric disorders. A systematic review. Reprod Health. 2020 Feb 17;17(1):25. doi: 10.1186/s12978-020-0880-9. PMID: 32066469; PMCID: PMC7027300.Note: Without citations, my abstract is 227 words. So, I don't know should I keep the citation or not. However, I do include everything here just in case. If the frame doesn't fit, please just remove the citations because I have seen so many abstracts without citations, but the citation is the recommendation from my abstract's reviewer.

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