Student Project &
Research Symposium

Oral
Presentation

Student Project &
Research Symposium

Poster
Presentation

Student Project &
Research Symposium

Performance

Student Project &
Research Symposium

Exhibition

9:40 AM - 10:00 AM
College Center 309
A Traumatic Brain Injury: Memory Loss and Treatment.
Nhu Quynh Nguyen
Date:
April 22nd, 2022
Division:
Kinesiology and Athletics
Department:
Kinesiology and Psychology
Mentor:
Michael Sutliff and Melissa Ferguson
Mentor's e-mail:
msutliff@occ.cccd.edu; mferguson25@occ.cccd.edu
Author's e-mail:
nhuquynhng87@gmail.com
Presentation Slides
Abstract:

According to a CDC report, there are 1.5 million Americans that sustain a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) each year, and about 5.3 million Americans are living with a TBI-related disability (CDC, 2016). There are a variety of causes, and one common cause is a closed-brain injury, which is a result of rapid forward or backward movement of the brain in the skull. Memory loss, trouble learning, and difficulty remembering new information are common consequences from experiencing a TBI. The purpose of this study was to measure the levels of impact of two treatment strategies, physical activity, and cognitive learning, on the improvement of memories after trauma. Understanding the treatment effectiveness of TBI with memory loss was determined through a combination of a literature review and interviews with traumatic brain injury survivors. After interviewing three individuals with TBI, it was determined that physical activity was used as therapy in all three, while two individuals practiced cognitive learning. A review of the literature found that physical activity and cognitive learning increase levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurogenesis, and neuroplasticity (Park & Bischof, 2013; Liu & Nusslock, 2018). These increases will help with memory recovery from the TBI. The primary recommendation from this study encourages individuals with TBI to be more active, engaging in outdoor aerobic exercise while practicing cognitive learning.

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